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Super Bowl Media Day was today, and of all the sound bytes and interviews, the one everyone’s talking about is the one that was probably least likely to happen: Deion Sanders’ “I’m just ’bout that action, boss” interview with Marshawn Lynch:

The surprise part of this interview is twofold: For one thing, Lynch is a notorious non-talker; for another, he plays on the same team as arguably the league’s most outspoken player in recent memory. Suffice to say, no one really figured the quote of the day would come from Marshawn Lynch.

The interview didn’t just happen, though. Deion Sanders made it happen, and in doing so he demonstrated a few things that even seasoned journalists could take notes on:

  • Just do it. Deion knows Marshawn doesn’t like to talk. Everyone knows that. Marshawn had positioned himself out of the way, trying his best to avoid talking. But Deion went up to him anyway. The quotes you won’t get are the ones you don’t ask for.
  • Be friendly. This could’ve easily been a confrontational situation from an exasperated reporter just trying to get “a quote”—the same old “blah, blah, we’re here to play our game and execute, blah, blah,” routine that Erin Andrews bemoaned after her Richard Sherman interview. Deion knew he’d have to get Marshawn comfortable if he was gonna get anything out of him.
  • Be persistent. Once Deion had Marshawn cornered, he made that interview happen. Look at the video and watch Deion’s body language—he’s practically blocking Lynch from stepping away.
  • Talk, don’t “interview.” This doesn’t play like a traditional media interview, and that’s because it’s not. Deion knew he wasn’t interviewing Peyton Manning here, so he just loosened up and talked. And it worked great—“I’m just ’bout that action, boss.” Great quote, and one we’ll probably be using for years to explain why Marshawn isn’t talking again.

One parting thought: Baseball, football, interviewing…is there anything Deion Sanders isn’t good at? I guess rapping, but three out of four ain’t bad.

Grinding It Out On Social Media

Credit: Faruk Ates / Flickr

Credit: Faruk Ates / Flickr

Every week, we learn about some new, cool thing that a brand did on social. We all talk about it and share the link around, and then by the middle of the week after, we’ve forgotten about it because we’re on to some other thing.

But if you’re the brand with The Thing, that week after is when the real work starts.

Good social media isn’t about doing flashy stuff, even though flashy stuff is sometimes good. Value for you and your social community comes from having an open channel through which to communicate.

If the flashy stunt you just did helped raise awareness of the fact that you’re there and you’re listening, great. Your job from there on out is to make sure you are in fact there and listening.

Tac Anderson’s Moleskine GTD Hack

Credit: Sean McGrath / Flickr

Credit: Sean McGrath / Flickr

So since I’ve been sharing so much productivity stuff lately, I just had to pass along this link to Tac Anderson’s Moleskine GTD hack, which came to me by way of Jess Estrada. I’ve just been using it for a day, but I like it, and I can see how with a few small modifications, it could work really well for me.

My favorite part is it incorporates a work diary, which I haven’t been good enough about keeping. It’s also just a really nice way overall of organizing a notebook. Mine, up till now, has just been a scattered ongoing log of notes I jotted down when I needed to. Now, especially if I incorporate the tabs (just read the link) things will be much easier to find and refer back to.

You Should Wash And Dry Your Hands This Way

In the words of Frank Lapidus, I’m no tree-hugger, but—watch the first two-and-a-half minutes of this video, and you’ll never wash your hands the same way again:

I’ve been doing this all week. It works great, and if I’m helping reduce the amount of paper we use every year, even better.

How I’m Being More Productive In My Free Time

Credit: Trekking Rinjani / Flickr

Credit: Trekking Rinjani / Flickr

I’m a hardworking guy, but I’m also a horrible procrastinator. I’ve learned how to make those two seemingly contradictory traits work in my professional life, but my personal life still needs work.

During an especially grueling week at the office, I’m prone to coming home, plopping down on the couch and vegging out for a day or two straight. By Monday morning, I’m sitting at my desk going “What the hell did I actually do this weekend?” As nice as it is to have times when I just don’t do anything—and I think that’s important—it sucks to feel like entire days or weekends are wasted.

My remedy for avoiding that is simply to ask myself a question: Was what you just did worth the time you spent on it?

It sounds too easy, but it’s actually really effective. It’s the difference between deciding in advance that I’m going to dink around online for an hour and realizing, “Holy shit, I just spent my entire evening dinking around online.”

Again, I’m not sitting here acting like a shark, where I always have to be moving. But I want my free time to feel after the fact like it was good, worth it, refreshing and well used. I want to be able to be like, “Yeah, I did this, that and that this weekend. Boom.”

If you’re a procrastinator like me and want to make more of your personal time, I highly recommend checking out this post from Business Insider, which inspired my post.

2014 Fitness Plan: Run For ‘Fringe’

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I love this tip from The New York Times on how to keep New Year’s Resolutions:

Bundle your temptations. This is one of our favorite strategies for tackling health goals, which we tested in an experiment described in a forthcoming paper in Management Science. The idea is best illustrated with a scenario: Imagine you want to exercise more but struggle to drag yourself to the gym. Imagine you also have a fondness for trashy novels but feel guilty wasting your time reading them. The solution is simple: Allow yourself to read those novels only while exercising at the gym. Our research demonstrates that when you leave your copy of “The Hunger Games” (or such) at the gym, you exercise 56 percent more often (and 61 percent of people will even pay the gym to hold their book so it is only available when exercising).

I don’t belong to a gym, and I’m even less interested in The Hunger Games. However, I would like to start running more and I loves me some Fringe; hence, Run For Fringe. Simple: If I want to watch an episode of Fringe, I have to run first. It’s doubly advantageous, too, since “paying” per episode will force me to stretch out my viewing time.

In an alternate universe, I’m already doing this.

Trailer Of The Year, For Me

This one killed it for me on every level. Mostly, it was the timing and theming brilliance of pairing the frenetic cuts of The Wolf Of Wall Street with Kanye’s “Black Skinhead.” Excess meets excess. Phenomenal.

If it’s possible for a movie trailer to punch you in the face, this one does it.

Here’s A Cool Way To Display Quotes

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I “found” (it was a featured app) a new iOS app today that could be a really neat tool for mobile blogging. It’s called Notegraphy, and it turns your copy into something like what you see above.

I like this for quick blog posts, when I don’t have time to look for an image I like (like now!), but I can also see it working for social network editorial calendars and all-around fun.

There are a handful of layouts to choose from, each built by a professional designer, and there’s also a social network within the app. I haven’t used the latter yet, but I imagine it could be good for discovery.

You might see more of these pop up on my blog. Send me a good quote if you’ve got one.

This Is My Favorite Sentence Today

You gotta love (and envy) how much fun sportswriters get to have with their copy. Here’s Dave Cameron at U.S.S. Mariner, addressing rumors that the Seattle Mariners are interested in free agent Carlos Beltran:

The Yankees want Beltran, the Rangers want Beltran, the Cardinals want Beltran back; barring some kind of unreported desire to have access to fresh caught salmon, there’s little reason to think that Carlos Beltran is going to be particularly excited about playing for the Mariners.

If you’ve seen a more entertaining sentence today, feel free to share in the comments.

Cool: Jack Dorsey’s Daily Do-And-Don’t List

Caricature of Jack Dorsey

Credit: Link Humans / Flickr; artist Alejo Malia

One of my “if you could have dinner with anyone” people is Jack Dorsey. I’ve found the guy fascinating ever since I read Vanity Fair’s piece on him and found out he and I share a love of city infrastructure.

We also, it turns out, share a love of lists. @Jack keeps a list of daily do’s and don’ts to help himself stay productive:

Here’s some of the items from Jack’s “do” list:

  1. Stay present: don’t focus on the past or the future.
  2. Be vulnerable: show people your mistakes and fears so that they can relate
  3. Drink only lemon water and red wine
  4. Six sets of 20 squats and push-ups every day, run for 3 miles, meditate on this list, stand up straight, spend 10 minutes with a heavy bag
  5. Say hello to everyone
  6. Get 7 hours of sleep

Here’s his “don’ts”:

  1. Don’t avoid eye contact
  2. Don’t be late
  3. Don’t set expectations and not meet them
  4. Don’t eat sugar
  5. Don’t drink hard liquor or beer during the weekday

Even if you don’t agree with everything on this list (I don’t know how the hell I’m gonna not eat sugar or get 7 hours of sleep), it’s a great idea. There’s a lot of power in physically writing things down.

I haven’t yet settled on what should be on my list, but I am making one, and I’ll share it here once I feel like it’s ready — I want to be mindful of No. 3 on the “Don’t” list.